On wedding dresses and lit. reviews…

I did a lot today, alternating between looking at wedding dresses online (I’m getting married in August) and revising my prospectus lit. review.  But I feel like I accomplished much.  So I will alternate in this post as well with talking about what I did on my prospectus and photos of my favorite dresses so far.  Surprisingly, I enjoyed both activities – the writing and the dresses!  So you get both too.

Prospectus Task #1.  I revised my research questions, yet again.  Yesterday, I was able to meet with one of my committee members, who gave me suggestions on refining the questions.  They are in a similar form to the form that I posted last, now with some more wording tweaks.  The most useful thing my committee member told me yesterday was that the RQs serve to shape my data collection and beginning data analysis, and that’s all they really have to do.  So I think that my questions are pretty much there for that purpose.

Here’s fave wedding dress #1: The Mackenzie by Jenny Yoo.  

Prospectus Task #2.  I re-wrote my prospectus introduction.  It wasn’t as bad as I thought it was.  I really want to make a video for the intro still though, and I looked at the video footage of instructors talking about the challenges of teaching new media that I collected in Dec.  If I can get my act together, I’m making it and putting it in.

Fave wedding dress #2: The Presley by Amy Kuschel.  Looks a lot like fave dress #1, now that they’re juxtaposed!

 

Prospectus Task #3.  I added to the meta-awareness section of my Lit Review, putting in Jarratt et al., Fraizer, Bergman and Zepernick, and Nelms and Dively.  At this point in my grad career, I’m a master lit. reviewer, so I feel good about that section.

Fave wedding dress #3 (on the right), Bella by Jenny Yoo.  Conservatory appropriate, but mucho dinero for a little bit of dress.

 

All right, enough is enough.  Tomorrow I shall return with more prospectus news, and perchance you’ll get more dress options as well.

 

Fraizer on coaching transfer in context

Not much time to work on the prospectus today, but I did read Fraizer’s 2010 article on coaching transfer after FYC.  His point is that transfer coaching strategies (he pulls these from Beaufort: genre analysis, discourse community analysis, and metacognitive reflection) should be done when students are encountering new writing situations and new disciplines.  He points to “writing studios” and writing centers as places where this kind of transfer coaching can be done. 

I agree that “in context” coaching for transfer seems logical, but I’m not sure I’m ready to abandon having students reflect a lot in first year comp.  And new media composition offers a space where they can experience diverse writing situations IN the writing class, using diverse materials.  Can’t FYC be used to develop a “metacognitive foundation” for the awareness to come, if you will?  I will have to consider more.